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Trundle Dome - Icicle Canyon Cragging

Photo: Approaching the top of Flake Fest, which like many routes at Trundle, offers a mixture of crack, face, and slab climbing.

Attractions. One of the Icicle Canyon crags closest to Leavenworth, Trundle Dome dishes out a quiver of clean routes on solid granite. The crag is about a 10-minute walk from the road, offers a nice diversity of routes that are between 5.9 and 5.11 in difficulty, and will test your crack, face, and slab climbing techniques. Even if you don’t lead at these levels, it’s easy to walk to the top of the routes and use the many two-bolt anchors to top-rope different routes.

Rope. Most routes are 80 to 100 feet long, so one 60-meter rope is recommended.

Protection. Bring a normal rack (nothing really big needed) and about a dozen quickdraws. Most of the routes involve a mixture of crack climbing (traditional protection) and face or slab climbing (bolted). The bolts are a tad strung out so you should be comfortable leading with a little air under your heels.

Parking. The same pullout is used for the Fridge Boulder, Trundle Dome, Ski Tracks Crack, The Underhill, and Sam Hill. From Icicle Junction in Leavenworth, drive 3.45 miles up Icicle Canyon (if you reach the Snow Creek Trailhead, you’ve gone 0.8 miles too far). Park in a good-size pullout on the south side of the road (Waypoint: 47°32.837' N, 120°41.696' W). No permit needed.

Reaching the crag. Walk uphill along the road for less than 100 feet until you see the Fridge (a bouldering haunt) in the woods on the north side of the road. Walk to the boulder and head east on a good climber’s trail for about 150 feet. At a Y, go left and follow the steeper trail heading uphill (going straight goes to Sam Hill). Your fork stays left of a low-angle slab and leads to Trundle Dome (roughly 10 minutes of walking). Waypoint for base of crag: 47°32.942' N, 120°41.815' W.

Photo: Trundle Dome left to center. Click for a larger version of this picture.

Routes. Our picture shows most (but not all) of the routes. From left to right are:

  • Flake Fest, 5.9. Scramble up to a little, right-facing corner and climb it. Above the corner, face and slab climb past 3 bolts. Protection to 1.5 inches.
  • Sonic Fest, 5.11a. Also climbs a right-facing corner to the upper slabs which are unprotected and difficult. Top rope.
  • Sonic Boom, 5.9 to 5.10a. A bouldering start past two bolts leads to easy climbing up nice flakes and cracks. Surmount an overhang near the top 5.9. Gear to 2.5”.
  • Hundred Dollar Dash, 5.10a-b. Head up and slightly left on the right side of a big, slabby rock slump. Upper portion of the route follows slabs past 4 bolts that are a bit run out. Gear to 1.5”.
  • Boot Top Fracture, 5.11 a. Start at the same spot as route above but, after 10 feet, move right past a bolt to the crack forming the left side of the Cowboy Boot Pillar. Lieback up the Cowboy Boot, and then climb difficult slabs past 5 bolts. Gear to 3.5 inches for the lieback.
  • April Mayhem, 5.9. Climb past two bolts to reach the right side of the Cowboy Boot. Jam to the top of the boot, and then face and slab climb past 3 bolts to the top. Gear to 2.5 inches.
  • Bulkhead Blues, 5.11c. Steep, smooth slabs lead past 7 bolts to the top. A thin wired stopper can help protect the top.   

Map. Topographic map to the crags of the Lower Icicle

Shady Summer Climbing: This crag has east to southeast exposures. It can be hot in the middle of the day but is shaded by late afternoon, making it a good pick for post-work excitement.

 

 Photo: Below another view taking in most of the crag. Click for a larger picture of this image.

 

More Rock: Maps and details of over 30 regional climbing crags in this guidebook.

Leave It Better Than You Found It: This should be every outdoor user’s goal. Pick up trash left by others, pull some noxious weeds along your route, throw branches over unwanted spur trails, don’t ride or walk wet trails when you’re leaving ruts/footprints deeper than ¼ inch…

Disclaimer. Treat this information as recommendations, not gospel. Conditions change and those contributing these reports are volunteers--they may make mistakes or not know all the issues affecting a route. You are responsible for yourself, your actions, and your safety. If you won’t accept that responsibility, you are prohibited from using our information.